Do You Remember How You Learnt To Read?

photo of a boy reading book

Photo by mentatdgt on Pexels.com

In all probability you will not remember as that phase as someone said is ancient history. But for your child it could be an unpleasant present, if reading is a chore that needs to be done every single day simply because the teacher at school or a parent at home insists upon it. Needless to say, the chances of your child picking up the reading habit is extremely low. 

Imagine you are learning a new language, with a totally different script to make things worse. It is going to take time for you to grasp and if someone sat you down to make you read each day, insisting that you must read whether you like it or not, what would you do? You probably will go ahead and do it as in all probability you volunteered to learn the new language or you are forced to learn for professional reasons. If it is the latter reason, sure it can add a lot of stress to your life!

That is how it is for children too. If you insist that they practice reading because it is going to keep them in good stead in the future, it is hardly going to work. Children are about enjoying every minute in the present. By telling that that developing a skill now is going to do them good in the future, makes no sense at all to them.

Children are about enjoying every minute in the present. By telling that that developing a skill now is going to do them good in the future, makes no sense at all to them.

They crave for attention and love. Reading a book together is a great way to spend time together, talk about many things, paving way to many fascinating questions that may not have risen otherwise. What could be a better way to find answers to all those questions by reaching out books and reading all about a subject? Books are then associated with fun, love, spending time with a parent, finding answers to questions and not a chore that needs to be ticked off every single day.

Reading to make them feel important

girl standing grey pavement

Photo by Davis Sanchez on Pexels.com

Long texts are daunting to read. How about small messages in post it’s stuck on the fridge or someplace that attracts attention? These could be addressed to the child and could be reminders or short and simple instructions such as “Keep the jam inside the fridge.” The focus is no longer on their ability to read, but the parent shows that the child is trusted to be capable of reading and following simple written instructions. It is a huge confidence booster and kids tend to feel important when parents show confidence in a child’s ability to do something.



Are you a parent who loves books and has been trying to raise a reader? Would you like to share your experiences for the benefit of other parents? Write to lakshmi.mitter@yahoo.com

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s